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Vento MartíConsuelo, MuñozKatia, Sánchez CidMeritxell, e 2 altri


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Arrangement for a Silent Orchestra
Arrangement for a Silent Orchestra

Julie Comnick

vivo e lavoro a Prescott, Arizona, U.S.A.

data di nascita 19/01/1973

Curriculum

JULIE COMNICK 5922 Dearing Rd. · Prescott, Arizona · 86305 1.928.308.3837 · julie.comnick@gmail.com www.juliecomnick.com SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2015 Arrangement for a Silent Orchestra Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, South Gallery, Mesa, Arizona 2012 Arrangement for a Silent Orchestra Prescott College Art Gallery at Sam Hill Warehouse, Prescott, Arizona 2009 Prospect Space Gallery, Denver, Colorado 2008 According To Their Kind The Gallery at Flashpoint, Washington, DC 2006 Exhuming the Omitted Yavapai College Gallery, Yavapai College, Prescott, Arizona 2004 In Absentia Zg Gallery, Chicago, Illinois Communion with Vacancy Fine Arts Center Gallery, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, Illinois 2003 Featured Teaching Artist Exhibition Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago, Illinois 2002 Within Earshot Zg Gallery, Chicago, Illinois Julie Comnick: Paintings Creative Arts Workshop, New Haven, Connecticut 2001 Julie Comnick: Paintings Kittredge Gallery, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington Body Language: Drawings Gallery II, The Evergreen State College, Olympia, Washington Forecast in Hindsight MFA Thesis Exhibit, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana Julie Comnick: Drawings Emerson Cultural Center, Bozeman, Montana 1999 Evolution Impotence The Exit Gallery, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 1997 Enter to Win Oculus Gallery, Seattle, Washington 1996 Full Hookups Oculus Gallery, Seattle, Washington GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2015 Fires of Change Invitational Exhibition Coconino Center for the Arts, Flagstaff, Arizona Upcoming: September 22 – October 31, 2015 2014 Drawing Discourse: 5th Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Drawing S. Tucker Cooke Gallery, University of North Carolina, Asheville, North Carolina 2011 Wanderer Ship: Invitational Slide Exhibition Marc Chagall Museum, Vitebsk, Belarus Artlink 13th Annual Juried Exhibition A.E. England Gallery, Phoenix, Arizona 2008 UNspoken Coconino Center for the Arts, Flagstaff, Arizona 2007 14th Annual Realism Invitational Klaudia Marr Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Arts and Letters Faculty Exhibition Prescott College, Prescott, Arizona 2005 Conquered Mind, Awakened Spirit: The Visionary Paths Caladan Gallery, www.caladangallery.com 2004 Beth Allison Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri 2003 War Stories A Shenere Velt Gallery, Los Angeles, California Portrait-Investigation of Self: England/America Print Exchange Exhibition Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana; University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Camberwell School of Art, London, England; The London Institute, London, England; University of West England, Bristol, England Compendium Zg Gallery, Chicago, Illinois 2002 “I see London, I see France . . .” A.R.C. Gallery, Chicago, Illinois All-Media International Invitational 2002 Period Gallery, Omaha, Nebraska Wild Life: The Other Tradition Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland, Florida 2001 Narration: Emblem and Sequence in Contemporary Art Creative Arts Workshop, New Haven, Connecticut, First Place 2000 Scene / Unseen: National Art Exhibition Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, New Mexico Art on the Plains: 3rd Annual Regional Juried Exhibition Plains Art museum, Fargo, North Dakota What is Drawing Now? Weber State University, Ogden, Utah An Argument for Drawing Art Museum of Missoula, Missoula, Montana 1999 The End: Northwest Biennial Competition Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, Washington Art Equinox 1999 Paris Gibson Square Museum of Art, Great Falls, Montana JURIED REGISTRIES The Drawing Center Viewing Program, New York, New York COMMISSIONS 2013 The Children’s Garden Mural Project, Prescott, Arizona 2007 Arizona Commission on the Arts, Governor’s Arts Awards Art Award Object, Shelley Award for lifetime achievement PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Howard Tullman Collection, Chicago, Illinois Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland, Florida School of Art and Architecture, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana AWARDS / HONORS 2008 Creative Capital Workshop Grant, Arizona Commission on the Arts 2007 Artist Projects Grant, Arizona Commission on the Arts 2001 Montana State University Foundation Graduate Achievement Award Award of Excellence in the Master’s Program 1998 Montana State University Presidential Scholarship PUBLICATIONS 2015 Chorlton, David. Illustrations by Julie Comnick. A Field Guide to Fire FutureCycle Press, 2015 BIBLIOGRAPHY 2014 Selph, Katie. "An Arrangement for a Silent Orchestra," East Valley Tribune. December 25, 2014 Selph, Katie. “Burn, Baby, Burn!” Valley Lifestyles. December 31, 2014 Markgraf, Diandra. “Fires of Change,” Arizona Daily Sun. October 12, 2014, Sunday print exclusive, pp A1, A8 2010 Trickhouse Cross-Genre Arts Quarterly www.trickhouse.org, Volume 9, Summer 2010 2008 O’Sullivan, Michael. “Man vs. Beast: An Intimate Look,” The Washington Post. Weekend Section, January 18, 2008, p 39 Venart, Lynne. Arts and Events dcist http://dcist.com/2008/01/10/according_to_th_1.php, January 10, 2008 Bruner, Betsy. “Turning Art on its Head,” Arizona Daily Sun. Section B, January 20, 2008, pp 1-2 2006 New American Paintings: Western Competition Volume 11, Number 66, Nov, 2006, pp18-21 2005 Sundell, Ivy. Living Artists Evanston, IL: Crow Woods Publishing, 2005, pp 12-13 and 54-55 2003 New American Paintings: Midwestern Competition Volume 8, Number 47, Sep. 2003, pp 34-37 2002 Brunetti, John. “Rearview Mirror,” Dialogue Magazine. Volume 25, Number 3, September/October 2002, p 31 2002 Camper, Fred. “Critic’s Choice,” The Chicago Reader. Volume 31, Number 44, Section Two, August 2, 2002, p 23 Hawkins, Margaret. “Gallery Glance,” Chicago Sun Times. July 19, 2002 Artner, Alan G. Chicago Tribune July 24, 2002 Birke, Judy. “Two Artists Meet at the Junction Between Dreams and the Everyday,” New Haven Register. March 10, 2002 2001 Zimmer, William. “Creative Works with a Political Edge,” The New York Times. Connecticut edition, Art Section, June 24, 2001, p 11 Hoffman, Hank. “What’s the Story Here?” The New Haven Advocate. May 31, 2001 2000 New American Paintings: The MFA Annual 2000 Volume 5, June 2000, pp 30-33 PANELS 2014 Campus Conversations on Natural History Natural History Institute, Prescott College, Prescott, Arizona 2013 Artist Research and Development Grant Arizona Commission on the Arts The Art of Natural History - Moderator Natural History Institute, Prescott College, Prescott, Arizona EDUCATION M.F.A. 2001 Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, Painting B.A. 1995 The Evergreen State College, Olympia, Washington, Studio Art and Humanities 1994 E.F. International Language School, Barcelona, Spain CURRENT EMPLOYMENT 2004-present Studio Arts Faculty, Prescott College, Prescott, Arizona

Descrizione del lavoro

Arrangement for a Silent Orchestra is a painting and video project which explores the gradual dissolution of culture in contemporary society through the symbolic ruin of a personal and cultural icon, the violin. Using the violin as a metaphor, I intend to raise questions about the relationship between increasing technology and diminishing cultural heritage. I invite the audience to consider what makes the instrument precious in his or her own experience, and the impact of its loss. As the only child of a piano teacher, I was instructed at an early age to choose an instrument and stick with it. At age eight I selected the violin, and at eighteen I put it down. The years between were fraught with accomplishment and ambivalence as I excelled at an instrument that in my adolescence I didn’t feel particularly passionate about. Since then, the violin has shown up in a recurring dream: I stand on stage at a recital and the pages on the music stand are blank, I have no memory of the melody, and the ensuing silence is paralyzing. The violin has reappeared periodically in my paintings, and its image has become central to my personal iconography. We are all haunted by our unrealized pursuits, and anxiety is the material of our collective nightmares. I am interested in iconography as a social construct, and the images that endure in our collective memory. How does personal observation inform common experience? How are images tied to memory and social consciousness? And what is the role of pictorial representation in visual culture? For a period of nine months I solicited violins beyond repair from instrument shops nationwide. After collecting nearly one hundred violins, I piled them in a mountaintop clearing and burned them at dusk. Observing the site from six o’clock p.m. to six o’clock a.m., the documentation of the event is the source material for the series of large-scale paintings that depict the pile of violins in various phases of ruin: at sunset, illuminated by the lowering sun; at nightfall, in stages of burning; and at dawn, the charred remains. A video accompanies the paintings, documenting the pile from sunset to sunrise. From the parable of the burning bush to the tradition of burning books, burning is a symbolic act, if sometimes a regrettable one. While the violin is personally significant to me, it is culturally symbolic to a generation that, due to circumstances such as increased technology and reduced public funding for the arts, is less likely to learn to play an instrument in school, seldom attends the symphony, and is unlikely to pass values of musical heritage onto their children. To re-familiarize myself with the instrument after an eighteen-year hiatus, I resumed violin lessons and incorporated music practice into my studio practice. The exhibition of this project includes a personal performance of a deliberate selection: Beethoven’s Romance for Violin in F Major Op. 50. This is from the Romantic period, that of Francisco de Goya, whose historic paintings inspired my images. Departing from and expanding upon my former work, Arrangement for a Silent Orchestra propels my practice into the future. My past paintings and drawings were fragmented narratives along sociopolitical themes, whereas this project returns to my earlier interests in metaphor and allegory. My prior work was largely figurative, and now the figure is omitted; the absence of the figure emphasizes the viewer’s own relationship with the objects. And this is my first project that includes a video component to ground my paintings in the concept of time.

Tina Prize - Roma Artists Tina Prize - Berlin Artists Tina Prize - Bercelona Artists